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  1. #1
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    Any successful microbial growers on this site besides George?


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    Any microbial grower here or all still hempies, fert kids? Any links to people who strive for quality? (Was embarrassing a few years back with a bunch of scabs repelling quality growers and knowledge) Any interest for some next level shit?
    Last edited by CannaMonkey; 01-10-2019 at 06:07 AM.

  2. #2
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    @CannaMonkey
    Could you expound a bit more on your comment about electrical conductivity of the soil affecting the rhizospheres microbial growth. Conductivity does not sound like a pH thing. Maybe more of the structure perhaps. I am currently researching no till. The emphasis is on structure. They mention 1/3 castings 1/3 peat moss 1/3 perlite. Not too far from what you mentioned. Thats when my antenna went up. Researching farms as yourself getting their overhead down and it coming down to the structure of the soil and mulching. Good read. Bosmere Farms in Oregon are hoping to reach a $25 lb this season of growing. They are running 3,000+ plants though.

  3. #3
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    @Patient puffer,
    Ofcoarse...
    Conductivity regards total dissolved solids. Elements have pH regardless of what traditional chemistry says about it starting with compounds. It's not just in the zone around the roots as the mycelliym traffic it from zones outside what the plant cells can directly touch. I can walk you though any aspect of no till you wish. I only dust with castings a nd cover the ground with straw myself. Ah infinity soil, I love that 1/3 mix. Nothing better. Oh wait you said perlite, (aluminum silicate) which offers nothing for nutrient cycling. Replace that with clay and keep the top wet, bottom dry with a constant 20 to 25% moisture content. 25 a plant? I spend 1500g on straw and 1500 on castings which for my 200 plants (not to say my levels are not overkill) which puts me at 16.66 a plant there abouts. I don't have to water so the straw saved me tons of time too. No better quaily my friend
    Last edited by CannaMonkey; 01-10-2019 at 08:02 AM.

  4. #4
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    Think of salt on a slug, which for us is a microbe, and ferts are salts though microbial diversity is health and flavor via exudate potential asvwell as nutrient cycling
    Last edited by CannaMonkey; 01-10-2019 at 07:57 AM.

  5. #5
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    @CannaMonkey
    Okay i can understand that a high concentration of nitrates is going to impede biological diversity or keep it from thriving. Bottled nutes are notorious for being chalk full of chelated nitrates for quicker absorption. What about amendments like alfalfa and kelp? Are these things going to affect the conductivity of the soil? I could see how guanos may impart some nitrates as it is an excretory amendment. Being produced by biology, it will increase salts due to the animals "elimination". Aren't "guanos" good, as it can increase biological diversity within the soil?

  6. #6
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    Great points. Guanos can have microbes and helpful enzymes though the source greatly determines the nutrient values. Seeing how bats eat insects I wonder if chitin is also transferred as it is deposited. In small amounts I don't see the harm though I would stick with N rich guanos and use every sparingly. It could hinder nutrient cycling though I imagine, depending on soil conditions to start, it could be helpful to some. Plants actually use very small amounts of N even though they use more N then other elements. To much N regardless of source can hinder flowering so depending on climate and growing season, benefits may vary. At 1% phosphorus I also worry as in any forest soil P levels are .001ppm so hitting the flavor saturations capable of resulting in flavors that last up to an hour after smoking, in capable phenos, could be hindered. To what extent, we would have to see with a microscope. I'm not sure the impact if any for different levels. I suspect the same applies to alfalfa meal. I further have concern of its fermented origin. Ferments can build up nasty acids and anaerobic microbes that could also hinder nutrient cycling while also creating soils where nutrients are offgased. Ideally I think having a transplant capable of unhindered nutrient cycling, planted into soil with balanced nutrient cycling would be best though it can take some months to achieve depending on where the soil is at. I would prefer castings above both in an ideal setting though even too many castings have to much N for early season harvesting in some locals. I think genetic stability might need to be considered. As biological diversity is highly specific to specific locals and can vary from town to town it could add in or it could not. I would think with 60,000 species it may potentially add in a few though temperatures also cater to certain species. We should keep in mind only 500 species are found on every plant and microbes can be plant dna specific with evolutionary cycles. Tropical derived guanos used in Canada, for instance, may offer less benefit then using them in Mexico. I'm not sure they are needed though they could help establish quality soils, for some, depending on various factors. Seaweed I love. It can give stress resistance with B vitamins and Auxins. Auxins can promote more bushy growth that may increase trimming times for the same yield making more smaller buds. Bag appeal maybe lowered slightly unless cytokin balances are available to keep the ratios around 30 percent Auxins to 70 percent cytokinins. Around these ratios growth rates increase without alteration to plant proportions. Cytokinins mimic what yellow light does regarding stretching as it promotes cell elongation while Auxins mimic what blue light does regarding compact cell growth, node length compaction and shorter, a stouter plants. To many Auxins can also distort or hinder flowering though I've seen some mutant giant shark fin like stems with unbelievable thickness with such things. Kelp being high in K can aid the plant in flowering requirements if nutrient cycling is substandard though could hinder under some conditions. The Earth has so many balances so I imagine what's right or beneficasl may vary place to place. Of those mentioned I would suspect most would benefit from seaweed though there could be many factors to consider depending on various other factors. Different genetics have different needs as may different temperature potentials. Ideally for flower, diverse soils may not need anything and I say more smaller plants may have higher quality with less additives. With crazy statutes, limiting numbers, growing massive plants for top yeilds with little stress there may be some new balances to take into account. A mountain in the middle if nowhere with no silly regulations I'm not sure adding anything could help quality besides microbes. Rocky soils may have less potential to nutrient cycle when compared to clay due to particulate size.
    Last edited by CannaMonkey; 01-12-2019 at 09:34 AM.

  7. #7
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    Regarding alfalfa meal as a ferment we should consider the amino acids produced. In aneraobic digestive formation tanks N can be 9% and of that what part nitrate?. The amino acids produced are hearty. Over chelation can leave a plant starved with a soil, hindered

  8. #8
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    Regarding alfalfa meal as a ferment we should consider the amino acids produced. In aneraobic digestive formation tanks N can be 9% and of that what part nitrate?. The amino acids produced are hearty. Over chelation can leave a plant starved with a soil hindered

  9. #9
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    @CannaMonkey
    Through my research i have found the bats with insects as their diet, create nitrogen rich guanos that impart chitin. Chitin is derived from the shells of the insects. This is the same component that is imparted when shrimp or crab meal is applied. Chitin can also be sourced through dietary companies as a supplement for humans. I wonder if chemically this is the same stuff. Could we just add thenpowdered form of chitin to make it easier on our plants? Or would that in a sense make them lazy? Or would there just be a preponderance of Chitin available having an adverse affect?

  10. #10
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    Good questions. I'm not sure to be honest. I think I remember chitin aiding in mycorrhizae physiology as a needed component. I'm unsure what the smallest creature is to produce it. Do microathropods contain it? Does a protazon? I'm not sure. Can chitin be used by non mycorrhizae species? Do the plants directly use chitin or are the benefits created via it's environments potential? Molds are thin hyphae fungi, do they use chitin? Do mildews? All things I would love to understand and answers I feel are important to the growing profession
    Last edited by CannaMonkey; 01-12-2019 at 08:44 PM.

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