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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patient puffer View Post
    @Splatoid
    Refer to this

    ---

    Growing marijuana in coco coir is a fantastic alternative cultivation style. For beginner growers and those more practised in typical hydroponics or soil substrates alike, coco coir cultivation is easy to learn. By the end of this blog, you will be fully prepped for a coco coir cannabis cultivation experiment.

    WHAT IS COCO COIR?
    Coco coir is the recycled and processed natural fibre from the husk of coconuts, grown mostly in India and Sri Lanka. What was once regarded as waste material, in contrast today constitutes a magnificent growing medium for cannabis plants both indoors and outdoors. With a pH of typically between 6.5-7.0, coco coir is comparable to unfertilised soil. Coco coir is available from most grow shops in 50l sacks. It's sold just like soil. But usually more readily available in tightly compressed coco bricks.

    Coco Coir Soil

    HOW TO GROW MARIJUANA IN COCO COIR
    In the last few years, most soil growers have begun blending coco coir into their own homemade super soils. Even the manufacturers of most common grow shop soils recommend buffering the substrate with coco coir these days. Coco coir drains better and keeps the roots oxygenated more than standard peat-based mediums. So you already have experience cropping in soil. Why not dabble with a soil and coco coir mix before making the switch?

    Most coco coir growers like to add approximately 30% perlite to the mix for best results. Although a lot of growers are also mixing clay pebbles in at a similar ratio. With equally great results. So much so, that premixed blends of coco coir and clay pebbles can be found in some online grow stores.

    If you have coco coir in brick form, make sure to purchase a high-quality brand. Every brick will be relatively uniform. When you add 4-5l of water and leave it to soak for about 30 minutes, a consistent 9-10l of medium will be produced from each brick. Simply add perlite and mix by hand in a good-sized bucket.

    Low-grade coco coir bricks can sometimes be overdried. Occassionaly they can have odd sizes. Worse, some can be really tough to break down into usable growing medium. No matter how much water you add, bunk bricks won't crumble easily.

    Jiffy pellets are made from coco coir. Jiffys have been popular rooting mediums with growers for decades. Cuttings and seedlings once rooted can be transplanted into virtually any other substrate. Alternatively, you can use 1l starter pots filled with coco coir mixed with 30-50% perlite and transplant to larger containers of your preferred substrate later.

    Perlite and Coco Coir

    HOW TO FEED CANNABIS CULTIVATED IN COCO COIR
    Watering and feeding cannabis plants cultivated in coco coir is a relatively simple transition for hydroponics growers and organic growers. Generally, hydroponic fertilisers perform better than most brands' organic soil nutrients in coco coir. Specifically, coco specific nutrient ranges are worthy of consideration.

    Coco coir is more forgiving than most hydroponic mediums, but not quite as an effective buffer as soil. That being said, you absolutely can hand-water cannabis plants in coco coir as one would soil cultivated marijuana. Moreover, the grower can assess when to water by picking the pots up. Light and dry just as is the case with soil. That's your cue to water.

    Coco coir unlike most soils for cannabis cultivation is unfertilsed. This is where hydro growers get to transfer their skill set. A light nutrient solution must be applied just like in a hydro crop from the beginning. The pH of your water will have to be adjusted to ensure you stay at the sweet spot for coco coir, namely a pH value of 6.0. In order to accurately keep the pH and nutrient solution dialled in, you have two options.

    The simple option is to purchase high quality nutrients with pH perfect blends. Alternatively you can use standard hydro equipment. A pH meter and bottles of pH-Up and pH-Down will do the job. So you can either let the wonder nutrients work their magic or dial in the old fashioned way.

    Without coco specific nutrients you will pretty soon discover, that coco coir doesn’t retain calcium very readily. Dialling in the nutrient solution can be tricky for beginners. More so with a mix and match of hydro nutrients and supplements. Iron is another missing micronutrient in coco coir that growers experience deficiencies with and often never resolve, thus reducing the final harvest. Start with the coco specific nutrients and you won’t have to troubleshoot later. Especially if you are a first-time grower.

    Coco Coir Benefits

    ADVANTAGES OF COCO COIR
    LESS STRESS MORE SUCCESS
    Cultivating cannabis in coco coir is pretty uncomplicated and just like any other grow op; once you have your system dialled in, it's plain sailing. 'Nuff said.

    ROOTS
    Being oxygen-rich and an excellently water-retaining medium makes coco coir a really great habitat for cannabis plants' roots. In addition, coco coir retains phosphorus very well and combined with the aforementioned attributes roots will positively thrive.

    100% ECOFRIENDLY AND REUSEABLE
    Coco coir is a natural product and a totally reusable. In fact, by growing ganja with coco coir you are recycling and putting to good use what would have been wasted coconut husk left to rot and pile up like trash.

    LIGHT WEIGHT AND COVERT
    If you want to keep your growing activities stealthy and delivery costs to a minimum, coco bricks are an elegant solution. A couple of 6 packs of coco coir bricks is feather light in comparison to lugging two 50l bags of soil home from the grow store. Also, should you choose to have coco bricks delivered, they will incur far lower delivery charges and less attention than heavy sacks of soil. Perlite to mix with the coco coir can be discreetly sourced from the local garden centre.

    LESS VULNERABLE TO INSECTS AND PLAGUES
    Root rot and nasty root invading fungi and insects are far less likely to plague the coco coir grower. Coco coir is nice and sterile and so well aerated, the roots develop almost as quickly as in advanced hydroponic setups.

    DISADVANTAGES OF COCO COIR
    The only real disadvantage of coco coir is if you happen to mistakenly buy a low-quality brick, that may have been incorrectly processed or somehow contaminated. This is rare and if you stick with reputable high-quality coco coir brands you won’t have to worry about this kind of problem. It really comes down to grower preference which way to cultivate cannabis. If you ask us, you really can’t go wrong with coco coir.

    ---

    I was about to give an educated guess...then resesrched and became educated myself.
    Awesome thanks for the info. You are good at looking up resources that's for sure.
    I'm going to have next week before they close so I am going to spend some more money. I wish I was rich.

  2. #22
    Marijuana Growing Member
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    Next is Garden Lime. I added this as a pH buffer for the Sphagnum Peat Moss base i use. I have learned it brings a bit more as well.

    Screenshot_2018-12-17-18-47-00-1.png

    The effects of agricultural lime on soil are:

    it increases the pH of acidic soil (the lower the pH the more acidic the soil); in other words, soil acidity is reduced and alkalinity increased[1]
    it provides a source of calcium and magnesium for plants
    it permits improved water penetration for acidic soils
    it improves the uptake of major plant nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium) of plants growing on acid soils.

  3. #23
    Marijuana Growing Member
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    Next up is the rabbit food. A hydro store owner laughed at me and asked why i "wanted to put all that junk in there? (LOL)". Okay so it sounds a bit off, but from an organic stamd point it appears as a no brainer.

    Screenshot_2018-12-17-19-17-51-1.png


    Nutrition
    Ingredients
    Sun-cured Timothy Grass Hay, Oat Hulls, Wheat Middlings, Dehulled Soybean Meal, Ground Wheat, Dried Cane Molasses, Ground Flax Seed, Salt, DL-Methionine, Dicalcium Phosphate, Yucca Schidigera Extract, Vitamin A Supplement, Chorine Chloride, Mixed Tocopherols (preservative), Ferrous Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Zinc Oxide, Riboflavin, Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin E Supplement, Copper Sulfate, Niacin, Menadione Sodium Bisulfite Complex (source of Vitamin K activity), Rosemary Extract, Citric Acid, Cholecalciferol (source of Vitamin D3), Calcium Pantothenate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Thiamine Mononitrate, Folic Acid, Calcium Iodate, Biotin, Cobalt Carbonate, Sodium Selenite, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Extract (source of Protease), Dried Bacillus licheniformis Fermentation Product, Dried Bacillus subtilis Fermentation Product. Allergen information: Manufactured in a facility that processes peanuts and other tree nuts.
    Guaranteed Analysis
    Crude Protein 13.0% min
    Crude Fat 1.5% min
    Crude Fiber 20.0% min
    Crude Fiber 25.0% max
    Moisture 12.0% max
    Calcium 0.25% min
    Calcium 0.75% max
    Phosphorus 0.3.0% min
    Salt 0.25% min
    Salt 0.75% max
    Iron 150 ppm min
    Copper 15 ppm min
    Manganese 70 ppm min
    Zinc 60 ppm min
    Vitamin A 3,000 IU/lb min
    Vitamin D 200 IU/lb min
    Vitamin E 20 IU/lb min
    Riboflavin 3 mg/lb min
    d-Pantothenic Acid 4 mg/lb min
    Niacin 16 mg/lb min

  4. #24
    Marijuana Growing Member
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    Next is Brewer's Yeast.
    Screenshot_2018-12-17-20-44-34-1-1.png
    Screenshot_2018-12-17-20-45-16-1.png
    There is its amino acid profile. Plants need to "synthesize" 20 amino acids to make a protien. So why not help them?

  5. #25
    Marijuana Growing Member
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    Finally i put all this in to my Sphagnum Peat Moss

    Screenshot_2018-12-17-20-51-05-1.png

    Peat moss is a gardening staple as a soil conditioner with Canada supplying over 80% of the peat used in horticulture worldwide. Peat plays an integral role in most potting mixes because the organic material is relatively inert in that it does not harbor diseases and insects but has the ability to hold up to 20 times its weight in water. This unique characteristic makes it invaluable for growers wanting to start seeds or for young transplants.

    It also serves as one key element in our Living Soils. Here’s everything you need to know about peat moss:

    What is peat moss?
    Peat moss is a general name for about 400 different types of mosses. They are well known for their ability to accumulate and store large amounts of water, even as they decompose. When used as a soil amendment, peat moss usually consists of partially decomposed remains of different mosses. You might also see it referred to as sphagnum moss.

    What nutrients are found in peat moss?
    Peat moss is not known for providing a wide range of micronutrients for plants. However, it can be used very effectively as a soil improver that helps retain micronutrients from fertilizers and other substances. Peat moss is able to bind or hold on to tremendous amounts of nutrients. Thus, the surrounding soil will be able to hold nutrients more effectively.

    Why is peat moss a crucial ingredient in a living soil?
    Peat moss is one of the best choices when you need a soil amendment that increases water retention. Important to remember that a good soil is about 25% air and 25% water – two essential components to life. Using peat in combination with perlite (carbon that has been superheated – kind of looks like Styrofoam chips) can help create a perfect growing environment with little pockets of air and water. Roots growing into these pockets are surrounded by the life in the soil and that’s how microbes help deliver nutrients to the plant.

    Is using Peat Moss a Sustainable Choice?
    sources their peat from companies with a commitment to sustainable peat bog management. Proper harvesting based on ecological principles have these bogs becoming a source to drawn down carbon from the atmosphere within 15 years. So, we firmly believe that, if properly managed, peat is a renewable resource and a far more sustainable choice than coco coir.

    Benefits of Peat Moss for Indoor Gardening
    Peat moss does not contain any of the harmful pathogens that can flourish in indoor soil;
    Peat moss is one of the best options available for crops that require acidic growing media;
    It serves as a natural amplifier for Living Soils and your own organic composts;
    It is a great way to spark ideal initial conditions as both a soil builder and a seed starter.
    Benefits of Peat Moss for Outdoor Gardening
    Unlike many forms of conventional compost, peat moss does not contain any weed seeds;
    Peat moss can stay active in outdoor soil for years, improving aeration (in clay soils) and water-holding (in sandy soils);
    Because of its exceptional water retention, peat moss is great for any rocky or sandy soil;
    When used in combination with compost, peat moss can extend its life by several years.

  6. #26
    Marijuana Growing Member
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    Mix the Peat Moss with ample amounts of perlite and soak it. Place it in a trash can for a month and your plants won't need anything ALL year. Just water.

  7. #27
    Marijuana Growing Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patient puffer View Post
    Some people have asked me what i use(d). I always hate digging for it. I never remember where it is. So i decided to oost it here. This recipe is still evolving. After my first year i realized there are A) Quick release nutrients B) Slow release nutrients. So after my first year i augmented it to have quick and slow release of N-P-K. Attachment 111175
    Sorry i didn't rewrite it. I am lazy.

    Guess i could have at least cropped....not tuh-day!!!

    AND...almaot ALL of thr amendements are DownToEarth products. Its not cheap. I remcommend buying a couple boxes a month. They are about $10-$15 each.
    Once ready you combine everything AND YOU HAVE TO LET IT SET FOR A MONTH!!! There no short cut on that part. LOOK AHEAD!!! If you are planting in April, you NEED to mix your soil in March. YOU HAVE TO!!!
    Sounds way too hot. I'd try a side by side with 2-3 tbs castings replacing every other ingredient on your list. I would also add clay so there is a medium for nutrient cycling. P levels in forests are .001ppm. P is super harsh. Soaking saturated soil for a month your offgasing ions and creating so many anaerobic issues.
    Last edited by CannaMonkey; 12-30-2018 at 11:21 AM.

  8. #28
    Marijuana Growing Member
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    @CannaMonkey
    The mix sounds like it would be hot but after a month of cooking (super soil method) the amendments are broken down by bacteria and micorbes and worms. The plants came out dark green but showed no ill affects. The anaerobic issues are alleviated by flipping the soil which most do. I usually do but didnt this year. The pots/planters are open on the bottom so the plants can still mingle in the ground which is a high loamy soil. Tons of clay in it. I actually am located on an old river bed where the whole city has loamy soil. This method has worked 2 years for me. This is my sativa slab with the soil. Screenshot_2018-11-23-22-50-52.png
    I only top dressed Rock Phosphate & Langbeinite in mid-July for P&K boost. Plus add extra Cal/Mag (dont think i needed any)

  9. #29
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    Growing with nutrients surely grow green plants. My concerns are with electrical conductivity which hinder microbial populations. Bacteria do hold more ions then any other species limiting mobilized levels. For high flavor with less harshness, I try and go gently on elemental levels especially with P.

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