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  1. #1
    Marijuana Growing Member
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    Cannabis and Eczema / Psoriasis


    0 Not allowed!
    This is a little thread i felt needed to be started. I was unaware of the whole thing. This plant can heal in ways i might have to start taking notes on. The list is getting lengthy.
    So my Mom came to me and asked if i had any CBD oil? I asked why. (She used to smoke the herb) She told me her Dr recommended it for her Psoriasis she has on her scalp. I said of course, but she wasn't interested in the coconut oil. It leaves her hair too oily she said. I presently do not have my CBD in a different carrier than coco oil. So after some time i convince her to give it a whirl. After a week she says she is seeing a positive response. This is why i felt this thread is needed. Somone else's Mom or even themselves can be benefiting yet ANOTHER way with this miracle herb. I still need to get more details from her. I will post some info from the "Eczema Foundation" and info on Psoriasis as well.

  2. #2
    Marijuana Growing Member
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    0 Not allowed!
    https://nationaleczema.org/can-marijuana-help/

    Weed cream. THC lotion. CBD salve. They go by many names, and there is a lot of interest and hope in the dermatological community that marijuana—or cannabis—may provide an alternate treatment pathway for a variety of skin diseases, especially atopic dermatitis (AD).

    As of 2017, 29 states and Washington D.C. have legalized some type of marijuana programs. These programs range from full legalization for recreational use, to medical use only, or decriminalization.

    Dermatologists across the country, particularly in states where cannabis has been made legal, are inundated with questions such as, “Will tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) or cannabidiol (CBD) topicals work for my skin condition?”

    Unfortunately, the fractured regulatory market of cannabis topicals makes it challenging for doctors, consumers and even regulators to understand the benefits and risks. In this article, we’ll take a look at the science and potential benefit behind the molecules found in marijuana for dermatological conditions.

    The science behind medical marijuana

    Marijuana, derived from the plant Cannabis sativa, is one of the oldest and most widely used drugs worldwide. Of the more than 60 agents in marijuana, only THC has intoxicating effects. This has not only contributed to its illicit status in the medical field, but has also hindered research on its health benefits.

    Cannabis, marijuana and hemp are often lumped together as a single plant. Cannabis or marijuana, and other related colloquialisms such as weed, pot and ganja, are used to describe THC-rich cannabis varieties that, when used, make people feel intoxicated.

    Hemp is legally defined as a cannabis plant having less than 0.3 percent THC, so it is often termed a “low THC variety.” Marijuana is legally defined as cannabis having greater than 0.3 percent THC. If that wasn’t complicated enough, marijuana and hemp are regulated separately, with less regulatory oversight for hemp.

    Aside from the array of major cannabinoids, a variety of other molecules are produced by both hemp and marijuana, including terpenes, which create the unique scent from one strain of plant to another, and flavonoids, which contribute to the pigment of the plant.

    Marijuana has relatively higher concentrations of cannabinoids, terpenes and other molecules leading to its intense scent and coloring, and these constituents interact with the human body through the endocannabinoid system, which then interacts with other physiological systems.

    The relatively recent discovery of cannabinoid receptors throughout the human body has led to more open discussion on their role as a viable treatment for diseases.

    Not all cannabinoids make people feel “high”

    Best known as the main chemical agent in marijuana, THC is responsible for its psychoactive properties, which has stigmatized the plant in the minds of many people. However, cannabinoids are a diverse group of compounds that have great potential to treat many medical conditions without making the patient feel intoxicated.

    There are five major cannabinoids found in marijuana:

    cannabidiol (CBD)
    cannabichromene (CBC)
    cannabigerol (CBG)
    delta (9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)
    cannabinol (CBN)
    Since the first human cannabinoid receptors were discovered in the late 20th century, many applications for these extracts of the cannabis plant have been found.

    Of particular interest in AD are these respective cannabinoids’ anti-inflammatory and anti-itch properties. Additionally, the high safety profile and relatively low levels of cannabinoids needed to have an effect on the skin result in low systemic absorption into the bloodstream, which eliminates the risk of potential intoxication from THC.

    How does cannabis help eczema?

    It has long been observed that cannabinoids possess anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and anti-itch qualities, but not until recently has high-quality research been published to understand the physiological effects underlying these anecdotal reports.

    Dr. Henry Granger Piffard, MD (1842-1910), was one of the founders of American dermatology. He was the founding editor of the Journal of Cutaneous and Venereal Diseases, known by its current name, JAMA Dermatology.

    The first textbook of dermatologic therapeutics was also written by Piffard. In it he notes, “a pill of cannabis indica at bedtime has at my hands sometimes afforded relief to the intolerable itching of eczema.” Since then, there have been myriad studies published on the potential benefits of cannabinoids in skin conditions.

    Many features of AD contribute to itch, particularly dry skin, histamine release and sensory nerve fibers. Cannabinoids, however, have a powerful anti-itch effect. There are receptors in the skin that interact with cannabinoids that could reduce the symptoms and appearance of AD. These effects happen through a constellation of interactions between phytocannabinoids and our endogenous cannabinoid system.

    Another way cannabinoids hold promise as a treatment are through management of Staphylococcus aureus colonization, which is both a complication and a driving factor of AD.

    The antimicrobial characteristics of cannabinoids have been referenced since the 1980s, but a more detailed analysis of individual cannabinoids found that all five major cannabinoids showed potent activity against a variety of S. aureus strains.

    What does this mean? Cannabinoids have an anti-microbial effect, but more testing is needed to understand the risks and benefits of cannabinoids in dermatology.

    Cannabinoids also exhibit anti-inflammatory properties. Researchers demonstrated that topical THC suppresses allergic contact dermatitis in mice by activating CB1 receptors. Other molecules, similar to those present in cannabis, have also demonstrated significant anti-pain properties in rat models.

    There are reports of direct improvement of AD with topical cannabinoids. A recent study demonstrated that a molecule interacting with the endocannabinoid system inhibited mast cell activation. Mast cells are immune cells that release histamine when activated, which leads to intense itching and inflammation.

    In a human trial for patients with AD, an endocannabinoid cream improved severity of itch and loss of sleep by an average of 60 percent among subjects. Twenty percent of subjects were able to stop their topical immunomodulators, 38 percent ceased using their oral antihistamines, and 33.6 percent no longer felt the need to maintain their topical steroid regimen by the end of the study.

    The future of cannabis creams for eczema

    For eczema patients, extra caution should be taken because a variety of known irritants are very prevalent in many “weed creams”. The indiscriminate addition of terpenes that can be irritating are often included in these formulations.

    Special attention should be given to choosing a product to ensure that only non-irritating terpenes are included in the formula. Topicals should be chosen based on the profile of ingredients that are known to reduce pain, inflammation and irritation for the skin, not formulations that may have been developed for muscle and joint pain. Additionally, excess solvents from the manufacturing process could also be present.

    With 29 states and counting having some form of legalization of medical marijuana, this means that there are at least 29 state regulatory schemes.

    To further complicate things, hemp-based products (low THC varieties) can be purchased online and have virtually no regulatory oversight for potency, consistency or contaminants including pesticides and metals.

    Incorrect dosing and inaccurate labeling has plagued the industry since inception. A recent study by Penn State University determined that up to 70 percent of online CBD products are inaccurately labeled.

    Until clinical data is created for specific products, the best advice may be to pay special attention to the ingredient lists and make sure that products are tested by a third-party laboratory instead of the manufacturer themselves. State markets with dispensaries typically regulate testing, which is an added consumer protection compared to purchasing a product on the internet.

    Cannabinoids represent an exciting prospect for the future of AD therapy. With measurable anti-itch, anti-pain, anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties, the effect of cannabinoids in patients with AD has already begun to be demonstrated.

  3. #3
    Marijuana Growing Member
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    https://www.royalqueenseeds.com/blog...-response-n423




    OUR BLOG

    CBD CAN RELIEVE PSORIASIS BY BALANCING IMMUNE SYSTEM’S RESPONSE
    Psoriasis is generally considered an autoimmune and genetic disease. The endocannabinoid system plays a role in regulating skin cells' life. Research and patients' experience are proving CBD and THC oils and balms can reduce inflammation and slow down skin cells' growth.

    72 9 8 Feb 2017
    CBD, THC, and maybe other cannabinoids are anti-psoriasis agents. Under a psoriasis condition, skin cells are replaced every 3 to 5 days rather than the normal 30 days. This excessive and rapid growth of the epidermal layer of the skin generates red, itchy, and scaly patches. They may be localized or completely cover the body.

    Psoriasis is generally considered an autoimmune and genetic disease triggered by environmental factors. Cold, medications, infections, traumas, body and psychological stress may play a role in starting the disease. Psoriasis is not contagious, and there is no cure for the moment. However, various treatments can control the symptoms. Psoriasis is associated with an increased risk of psoriatic arthritis, lymphomas, cardiovascular disease, Crohn's disease, and depression. Psoriatic arthritis affects up to 30% of individuals with psoriasis.

    REACTIVE SYSTEMS WITHIN OUR SKIN
    The underlying mechanism of psoriasis involves the immune system. As research recently found, the endocannabinoid system constantly binds with some of the messaging molecules within our immune system, thus regulating a bunch of primary physiological functions. The main role of the endocannabinoid system seems to be contributing to the control of cells’ balance, proliferation, differentiation, tolerance and death. This is valid also when it comes to skin cells and dermatology issues.

    The communications channels through which endogenous, botanical or synthetic cannabinoids bind to our immune system are now beginning to be understood. These biochemical mechanisms fall into four different actions, which are cell apoptosis, inhibition of cell proliferation, suppression of cytokine production, and reduction of white blood cells. Cytokines are the main inflammatory chemical signals secreted by immune cells in case of distress, and all these actions are part of the common, yet evolving, defensive strategy which our body constantly applies. This lab-proofed mechanism confirms that the activity of the endocannabinoid system might prevent, or otherwise facilitate, the development of skin diseases and other ailments.

    EXSTINGUISHING AN INFLAMMATION
    inflammation cannabinoid system psoriasis pain tissue breakage
    In a psoriasis condition, the inflammatory state in the dermis causes the premature maturation of skin cells, leading to pain and skin tissue breakage. Research widely proved that cannabis is a potent anti-inflammatory. Focusing on the non-psychotropic cannabinoid CBD, one 2010 review of several studies suggested, that substances, which target the endocannabinoid system’s CB2 receptor may provide treatment to inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. This finding confirms the potentiality of CBD against psoriasis, as it bindswith the CB2 receptor to exert its biochemical action on our immune system’ssignalling network.

    One of the clearest scientific evidence about CBD action on the skin inflammation is titled “Cannabidiol exerts sebostatic and anti-inflammatory effects on human sebocytes”. This research proves that CBD deploys a strong anti-acne action by slowing down the abnormal lipidic production under the skin, by suppressing cell proliferation, and by preventing the “pro-acne” agents to elevate cytokine levels, thus causing inflammation.

    BALANCING THE CANNABINOID SYSTEM BETWEEN SKIN LAYERS
    Cannabinoids’ action goes well beyond suppressing inflammation. The recent studies, which discovered the endocannabinoid system’s functions within the skin are also proving, that the disruption of the endocannabinoids’ balance might facilitate the development of both minor, or severe skin diseases. These findings open new possibilities for cannabis-based therapies, as mentioned in a study titled “The endocannabinoid system of the skin in health and disease: novel perspectives and therapeutic opportunities”

    Going forward on the research on endocannabinoids, a study titled “Epigenetic control of skin differentiation genes by phytocannabinoids” confirms that the endocannabinoid system plays a role in epidermal physiology. Our body-produced cannabinoid anandamide also regulates the expression of skin differentiation genes, while the phytocannabinoids cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabigerol (CBG) can control both cell proliferation and differentiation. This is confirmed by a study conducted in 2007 and published in the Journal of Dermatological Science. Scientists found that cannabinoids helppreventing dead skin cells buildup by inhibiting living cells proliferation. This action supports the fact that cannabis extracts could be effective compounds for the treatment of skin diseases.

    HOW THE SKIN CAN BENEFIT FROM A CBD EXTRACT
    Cannabinoids have shown to act both as immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory agents in skin diseases, as much as in other immune-mediated pathologies such as multiple sclerosis, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and allergic asthma. Both CBD and THC dampen the body’s immune response, which is desired for conditions related to an overactive immune system. Since there are cannabinoid receptors in cells throughout the skin, it is possible to address a dermatological condition both with systemic and topical remedies. We have to remind that the real therapeutic potential of cannabinoids is far from being exploited, and nobody is today able to translate lab results and patients’ experiences into a standardized clinical practice.

    That said, the complete absence of adverse effects from CBD makes this cannabinoid a perfect phytotherapic substance. CBD oil has a significant amount of anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative characteristics that can act against the symptoms of psoriasis. Other cannabis topicals that help with psoriasis symptoms are balms, creams, or salves, infused with CBD, THC, or a combination of cannabinoids. While medical cannabis topicals and edibles have little or zero factors of toxicity, smoking cannabis can actually irritate conditions like psoriasis. The best choice for inhaling cannabis is a vaporizer.

    In most cases CBD balms and oils actually relief damaged skin, yet the benefits from the use of this herb are highly dependent on the quality of the extract, as much as on the patient’s particular condition. Some people saw their psoriasis vanish, others just experienced less inflammation and itching. In many cases, the cannabis-based extract didn’t seem to work, because its CBD concentration was too low. That’s something to consider when trying prepare homemade cannabis extracts for treating skin conditions.

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