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  1. #1
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    Cannabis and Cancer


    0 Not allowed!
    I am starting this thread to keep a collection of info i am going over regarding cannabis and cancer. A brother in law of mine has cancer. He is going through chemo right now and i am going to get him some of my oil i make. I was researching which cannabinoid is better for cancer and found some interesting reading so far. It seems both have properties that are "anti-cancer"

    https://www.projectcbd.org/about/lab...thc-and-cancer

    Mounting evidence shows ‘cannabinoids’ in marijuana slow cancer growth, inhibit formation of new blood cells that feed a tumor, and help manage pain, fatigue, nausea, and other side effects.

    Cristina Sanchez, a young biologist at Complutense University in Madrid, was studying cell metabolism when she noticed something peculiar. She had been screening brain cancer cells because they grow faster than normal cell lines and thus are useful for research purposes. But the cancer cells died each time they were exposed to tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the principal psychoactive ingredient of marijuana.

    Instead of gaining insight into how cells function, Sanchez had stumbled upon the anti-cancer properties of THC. In 1998, she reported in a European biochemistry journal that THC “induces apoptosis [cell death] in C6 glioma cells,” an aggressive form of brain cancer.

    Subsequent peer-reviewed studies in several countries would show that THC and other marijuana-derived compounds, known as “cannabinoids,” are effective not only for cancer-symptom management (nausea, pain, loss of appetite, fatigue), they also confer a direct antitumoral effect.

    A team of Spanish scientists led by Manuel Guzman conducted the first clinical trial assessing the antitumoral action of THC on human beings. Guzman administered pure THC via a catheter into the tumors of nine hospitalized patients with glioblastoma, who had failed to respond to standard brain-cancer therapies. The results were published in 2006 in the British Journal of Pharmacology: THC treatment was associated with significantly reduced tumor cell proliferation in every test subject.

    Around the same time, Harvard University scientists reported that THC slows tumor growth in common lung cancer and “significantly reduces the ability of the cancer to spread.” What’s more, like a heat-seeking missile, THC selectively targets and destroys tumor cells while leaving healthy cells unscathed. Conventional chemotherapy drugs, by contrast, are highly toxic; they indiscriminately damage the brain and body.

    There is mounting evidence, according to a report in Mini-Reviews in Medicinal Chemistry, that cannabinoids “represent a new class of anticancer drugs that retard cancer growth, inhibit angiogenesis [the formation of new blood cells that feed a tumor] and the metastatic spreading of cancer cells.”

    Dr. Sean McAllister, a scientist at the Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco, has been studying cannabinoid compounds for 10 years in a quest to develop new therapeutic interventions for various cancers. Backed by grants from the National Institute of Health (and with a license from the DEA), McAllister discovered that cannabidiol (CBD), a nonpsychoactive component of the marijuana plant, is a potent inhibitor of breast cancer cell proliferation, metastasis, and tumor growth.

    In 2007, McAllister published a detailed account of how cannabidiol kills breast cancer cells and destroys malignant tumors by switching off expression of the ID-1 gene, a protein that appears to play a major role as a cancer cell conductor.

    The ID-1 gene is active during human embryonic development, after which it turns off and stays off. But in breast cancer and several other types of metastatic cancer, the ID-1 gene becomes active again, causing malignant cells to invade and metastasize. “Dozens of aggressive cancers express this gene,” explains McAllister. He postulates that CBD, by virtue of its ability to silence ID-1 expression, could be a breakthrough anti-cancer medication.

    “Cannabidiol offers hope of a non-toxic therapy that could treat aggressive forms of cancer without any of the painful side effects of chemotherapy,” says McAllister, who is seeking support to conduct clinical trials with the marijuana compound on breast cancer patients.

    McAllister’s lab also is analyzing how CBD works in combination with first-line chemotherapy agents. His research shows that cannabidiol, a potent antitumoral compound in its own right, acts synergistically with various anti-cancer pharmaceuticals, enhancing their impact while cutting the toxic dosage necessary for maximum effect.

    Investigators at St. George’s University in London observed a similar pattern with THC, which magnified the effectiveness of conventional antileukemia therapies in preclinical studies. THC and cannabidiol both induce apoptosis in leukemic cell lines.

    At the annual summer conference of the International Cannabinoid Research Society, held this year in Freiburg, Germany, 300 scientists from around the world discussed their latest findings, which are pointing the way toward novel treatment strategies for cancer and other degenerative diseases. Italian investigators described CBD as “the most efficacious inducer of apoptosis” in prostate cancer. Ditto for cannabidiol and colon cancer, according to British researchers at Lancaster University.

    Within the medical science community, the discovery that cannabinoids have anti-tumoral properties is increasingly recognized as a seminal advancement in cancer therapeutics.

  2. #2
    Marijuana Growing Member
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    0 Not allowed!
    This is the American Cancer Society's view on the matter. It is sad that the Feds have our country miswired so "ass tight" that our labs and scientists cant be exploring the purported effects this plant has on the numerous illnesses that plague us. Big Pharma has contrived their own versions of cannabis extracts. Dronabinol is one that mimics cannabis' affects. Yet they fall short due to side effects experienced by it's users and finishing neck and neck with a placebo when it comes to cancer. The root of the problem goes back further than i choose to dig right now. I think i had read some article one point that eluded to it dealing with the paper industry? That was a while ago and is a moot point.

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.can...nd-cancer.html

    Marijuana is the name given to the dried buds and leaves of varieties of the Cannabis sativa plant, which can grow wild in warm and tropical climates throughout the world and be cultivated commercially. It goes by many names, including pot, grass, cannabis, weed, hemp, hash, marihuana, ganja, and dozens of others.

    Marijuana has been used in herbal remedies for centuries. Scientists have identified many biologically active components in marijuana. These are called cannabinoids. The two best studied components are the chemicals delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (often referred to as THC), and cannabidiol (CBD). Other cannabinoids are being studied.

    At this time, the US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) lists marijuana and its cannabinoids as Schedule I controlled substances. This means that they cannot legally be prescribed, possessed, or sold under federal law. Whole or crude marijuana (including marijuana oil or hemp oil) is not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for any medical use. But the use of marijuana to treat some medical conditions is legal under state laws in many states.

    Dronabinol, a pharmaceutical form of THC, and a man-made cannabinoid drug called nabilone are approved by the FDA to treat some conditions.

    Marijuana
    Different compounds in marijuana have different actions in the human body. For example, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) seems to cause the "high" reported by marijuana users, and also can help relieve pain and nausea, reduce inflammation, and can act as an antioxidant. Cannabidiol (CBD) can help treat seizures, can reduce anxiety and paranoia, and can counteract the "high" caused by THC.

    Different cultivars (strains or types) and even different crops of marijuana plants can have varying amounts of these and other active compounds. This means that marijuana can have different effects based on the strain used.

    The effects of marijuana also vary depending on how marijuana compounds enter the body:

    When taken by mouth, such as in baked goods, the THC is absorbed poorly and can take hours to be absorbed. Once it’s absorbed, it’s processed by the liver, which produces a second psychoactive compound (a substance that acts on the brain and changes mood or consciousness) that affects the brain differently than THC.
    When marijuana is smoked or vaporized (inhaled), THC enters the bloodstream and goes to the brain quickly. The second psychoactive compound is produced in small amounts, and so has less effect. The effects of inhaled marijuana fade faster than marijuana taken by mouth.
    How can marijuana affect symptoms of cancer?
    A number of small studies of smoked marijuana found that it can be helpful in treating nausea and vomiting from cancer chemotherapy.

    A few studies have found that inhaled (smoked or vaporized) marijuana can be helpful treatment of neuropathic pain (pain caused by damaged nerves).

    Smoked marijuana has also helped improve food intake in HIV patients in studies.

    There are no studies in people of the effects of marijuana oil or hemp oil.

    Studies have long shown that people who took marijuana extracts in clinical trials tended to need less pain medicine.

    More recently, scientists reported that THC and other cannabinoids such as CBD slow growth and/or cause death in certain types of cancer cells growing in lab dishes. Some animal studies also suggest certain cannabinoids may slow growth and reduce spread of some forms of cancer.

    There have been some early clinical trials of cannabinoids in treating cancer in humans and more studies are planned. While the studies so far have shown that cannabinoids can be safe in treating cancer, they do not show that they help control or cure the disease.

    Relying on marijuana alone as treatment while avoiding or delaying conventional medical care for cancer may have serious health consequences.

    Possible harms of marijuana
    Marijuana can also pose some harms to users. While the most common effect of marijuana is a feeling of euphoria ("high"), it also can lower the user’s control over movement, cause disorientation, and sometimes cause unpleasant thoughts or feelings of anxiety and paranoia.

    Smoked marijuana delivers THC and other cannabinoids to the body, but it also delivers harmful substances to users and those close by, including many of the same substances found in tobacco smoke.

    Because marijuana plants come in different strains with different levels of active compounds, it can make each user’s experience very hard to predict. The effects can also differ based on how deeply and for how long the user inhales. Likewise, the effects of ingesting marijuana orally can vary between people. Also, some chronic users can develop an unhealthy dependence on marijuana.

    Cannabinoid drugs
    There are 2 chemically pure drugs based on marijuana compounds that have been approved in the US for medical use.

    Dronabinol (Marinol®) is a gelatin capsule containing delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) that’s approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat nausea and vomiting caused by cancer chemotherapy as well as weight loss and poor appetite in patients with AIDS.
    Nabilone (Cesamet®) is a synthetic cannabinoid that acts much like THC. It can be taken by mouth to treat nausea and vomiting caused by cancer chemotherapy when other drugs have not worked.
    Nabiximols is a cannabinoid drug still under study in the US. It’s a mouth spray made up of a whole-plant extract with THC and cannabidiol (CBD) in an almost one to one mix. It’s available in Canada and parts of Europe to treat pain linked to cancer, as well as muscle spasms and pain from multiple sclerosis (MS). It’s not approved in the US at this time, but it’s being tested in clinical trials to see if it can help a number of conditions.

    How can cannabinoid drugs affect symptoms of cancer?
    Based on a number of studies, dronabinol can be helpful for reducing nausea and vomiting linked to chemotherapy.

    Dronabinol has also been found to help improve food intake and prevent weight loss in patients with HIV. In studies of cancer patients, though, it wasn’t better than placebo or another drug (megestrol acetate).

    Nabiximols has shown promise for helping people with cancer pain that’s unrelieved by strong pain medicines, but it hasn’t been found to be helpful in every study done. Research is still being done on this drug.

    Side effects of cannabinoid drugs
    Like many other drugs, the prescription cannabinoids, dronabinol and nabilone, can cause side effects and complications.

    Some people have trouble with increased heart rate, decreased blood pressure (especially when standing up), dizziness or lightheadedness, and fainting. These drugs can cause drowsiness as well as mood changes or a feeling of being “high” that some people find uncomfortable. They can also worsen depression, mania, or other mental illness. Some patients taking nabilone in studies reported hallucinations. The drugs may increase some effects of sedatives, sleeping pills, or alcohol, such as sleepiness and poor coordination. Patients have also reported problems with dry mouth and trouble with recent memory.

    Older patients may have more problems with side effects and are usually started on lower doses.

    People who have had emotional illnesses, paranoia, or hallucinations may find their symptoms are worse when taking cannabinoid drugs.

    Talk to your doctor about what you should expect when taking one of these drugs. It’s a good idea to have someone with you when you first start taking one of these drugs and after any dose changes.

    What does the American Cancer Society say about the use of marijuana in people with cancer?
    The American Cancer Society supports the need for more scientific research on cannabinoids for cancer patients, and recognizes the need for better and more effective therapies that can overcome the often debilitating side effects of cancer and its treatment. The Society also believes that the classification of marijuana as a Schedule I controlled substance by the US Drug Enforcement Administration imposes numerous conditions on researchers and deters scientific study of cannabinoids. Federal officials should examine options consistent with federal law for enabling more scientific study on marijuana.

    Medical decisions about pain and symptom management should be made between the patient and his or her doctor, balancing evidence of benefit and harm to the patient, the patient’s preferences and values, and any laws and regulations that may apply.

    The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN), the Society’s advocacy affiliate, has not taken a position on legalization of marijuana for medical purposes because of the need for more scientific research on marijuana’s potential benefits and harms. However, ACS CAN opposes the smoking or vaping of marijuana and other cannabinoids in public places because the carcinogens in marijuana smoke pose numerous health hazards to the patient and others in the patient’s presence.

  3. #3
    Marijuana Growing Member
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    0 Not allowed!
    This article is specifically about CBD's main role in alleviating the debilitating symptoms associated with enduring chemotherapy. As unfortunate as it is, chemo is a viable option at times with an aggressive form of cancer. As mentioned above, cannabis can act synergistically with the other medications, thereby increasing their efficacy at destroying the cancer cells.



    https://echoconnection.org/chemother...arch-overview/

    Chemotherapy can cause several, sometimes debilitating, side effects. Studies have shown cannabinoids can make the adverse effects more manageable.

    Overview of Chemotherapy Side Effects
    Chemotherapy is a category of cancer treatment that uses strong drugs, administered orally or intravenously. There are more than 100 chemotherapy drugs that are used in the treatment of cancer. The drugs prevent cancer from spreading to other parts of the body, slow the growth of tumors, and kill cancer cells. While chemotherapy can be effective against cancer, it does cause sometimes-serious side effects.

    The side effects from chemotherapy develop because the chemotherapy drugs that attack cancerous cells also damage normal, healthy cells. Common side effects associated with chemotherapy are fever and chills, fatigue, nausea and vomiting, sore mouth, diarrhea, constipation, loss of appetite that can lead to anorexia, pain or difficulty with swallowing, swelling in the hands or feet, itching, shortness of breath, cough, and muscle or joint pain.

    Individuals undergoing chemotherapy won’t necessarily experience all side effects and the severity of the side effects varies greatly from person to person. Most side effects will gradually go away after completion of the treatment.

    Findings: Effects of Cannabinoids and CBD on Chemotherapy Side Effects
    Cannabinoids have shown to effectively reduce the nausea and vomiting that often occurs during and after chemotherapy treatments. Studies have found that one of the major cannabinoids found in cannabis, cannabidiol (CBD), is effective at treating the more difficult to control symptoms of nausea, as well as preventing anticipatory nausea in chemotherapy patients11,14. Another study found that tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), another major cannabinoid found in cannabis, is also effective at reducing conditioned rejection and chemotherapy-induced nausea10.

    Cannabis has also demonstrated that it can significantly reduce neuropathic pain; even pain that traditional treatment had been unsuccessful at managing15. In one study, cancer patients with intractable pain, and who had previously and unsuccessfully tried to manage their discomfort with opioids, saw significant reductions in pain levels after being treated with cannabis containing both THC and CBD for two weeks9.

    Cannabis can also help prevent weight loss and a loss of appetite in chemotherapy patients. THC has shown to significantly stimulate appetite in patients that have cachexia related to cancer8,12,13. In addition, patients undergoing chemotherapy and treated with THC have a larger appetite and report that food “tastes better”2.

    Research also suggests that cannabis may help reduce the swelling in the hands and feet that can occur alongside chemotherapy. Both THC and CBD have shown to have anti-inflammatory properties3. In one study, CBD effectively reduced edema in an animal’s paw7.

    A survey of 131 cancer patients participating in cannabis treatments for six to eight weeks reported significant improvements in all of the measured symptoms, including nausea, vomiting, mood disorders, fatigue, weight loss, anorexia, constipation, sexual function, sleep disorders, itching, and pain1. Patients treated with THC have also been shown to experience a higher quality of sleep and relaxation2. The National Cancer Institute, an organization run by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, recognizes cannabis as an effective treatment for providing relief of a number of symptoms associated with cancer and chemotherapy treatments, including pain, nausea and vomiting, anxiety and loss of appetite4.

    States That Have Approved Medical Cannabis for Chemotherapy Side Effects
    Nearly all states with cannabinoids laws have approved medical cannabis specifically for the treatment of cancer and therefore will permit it to be recommended for managing symptoms associated with chemotherapy. These states include: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire (also allowed for “chemotherapy induced anorexia”), New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington.

    Although the state of Maryland hasn’t approved medical cannabis to treat cancer, it has approved it for the treatment of nausea and chronic pain, two symptoms commonly associated with chemotherapy.

    In addition, in Washington D.C., any condition can be approved for medical cannabis as long as a DC-licensed physician recommends the treatment.

    Recent Studies on Cannabinoids and CBD’s Effect on Chemotherapy Side Effects
    Cannabis causes significant improvement in nausea, vomiting, mood disorders, fatigue, weight loss, anorexia, constipation, sexual function, sleep disorders, itching, and pain, in cancer patients after six to eight weeks of use.

  4. #4
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    0 Not allowed!
    Glad you are posting this info.

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