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  1. #1
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    Brewers yeast for cannabis


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    Hello all. Well i was doing research as i usually do and i ran across a topic that piqued my interest. In organic soil research i stumbled across info on plants using aminos acids during growth. Okay...sure. I believes that. Now i never thought about supplementing amino acids as i have had a chunk of cash go out on organic amendments for this years soil batches. Now from last years indoor grow i was supplementing CO2 for plants and was using yeast amd sugar. Well i purchased some brewers yeast...whoops!!!! Wrong kinda yeast for that application. So aside from using it as a supplement for myself for the amino acids, i figured i would save it for this years super soil mixture/recipe for its cultures. I assumed it has or had some kinda bio activity at some point and screw it, throw it in. So i am researching amino acids and cannabis and found a thread here and i started my research. I hope i can present the info i found in an informative manner.

    What do amino acids do for your plants?
    https://www.cannabisindustryinstitute...cannabis-grow/

    Yeast as a bio-fertilizer.
    https://www.researchgate.net/publica...and_Morphology

    What product has such a line up of amino acids?
    https://m.solgar.com/SolgarProducts/B...ast-Powder.htm

    I would have posted it all myself but i know i would not habe done it all justice. I find this topic amazing. I am currently mixing my super soil for cooking and i am adding about 1 Tbsp per cu. ft. This is the rate i am applying as i have a ton of soil to mix.

    Then as i was researching all this i found THIS!!!!
    https://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d-.../#.WpbWmZ-IY0M

    If you by chance you have read and reviewed these links you probably are just as astonished as i am. I will double check those links to be sure they work.

  2. #2
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    Another site here proclaiming the benefits of supplementing amino acids and potential effects seen through out many varying species.

    https://www.maximumyield.com/amino-acids/2/1483

    And how amino acids help with chelation of applied ferts and nutrients

    https://www.maximumyield.com/amino-a...ing-hand/2/916

    I should have called this thread amino acids for cannabis

  3. #3
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    Thanks @Patient puffer for the links, very interesting. About 6 months ago I started adding a hand full of powered milk to Fox Farm soil hoping for similar benefits. I don't know if it does any good but since the quality and the yield has been improving I'm afraid to stop.
    "We are the people our parents warned us about" credit Jimmy Buffett

  4. #4
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    @graygrower
    That powdered milk has an amino acid profile.

    https://www.thinkusadairy.org/product...-and-nutrition

  5. #5
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    Furthering my research on the amino acids and their effect on plants in general including cannabis

    So, to continue from the last post, a recap...

    The functions of amino acids in plants are near endless and science is constantly discovering more. Here are a few important effects:

    Increase chlorophyll production

    Provide rich source of organic nitrogen

    Stimulate synthesis of vitamins

    Influence various enzymatic systems

    Flowering is stimulated

    Better fruit setting

    Higher nutritional content, size, flavor, and coloration of fruits.

    Higher brix level (quality increase)

    Increased pest and pathogen resistance

    Protein biosynthesis

    Amino acids are the base structure for proteins. The standard amino acids combine in virtually infinite variations to produce countless different proteins. These proteins are essential to many structural components of plant tissue.

    Proteins have many different functions: structural (supportive), metabolic (enzymes and stimulation), nutrient transport, amino acid reserves. In fact proteins are used in virtually every biological process!

    Plants make their own proteins based upon the specific stage of growth, nutritional demands, stress, etc. They can only effectively build the needed proteins if the raw materials are present. And making amino acids is an energy intensive process. So, providing additional L-amino acids via the roots or leaf tissue ensures the plant has plenty of materials for building these important proteins.

    Resistance to abiotic stress

    Abiotic stress, such as high/low temperatures, drought, flooding, pest attacks, disease or phytotoxic effects from the application of chemical pesticides have negative effects on a plant metabolism. Of course this lowers crop quality and yield. Applying amino acid supplementation before, during and after stressful conditions gives plants the building blocks that directly provide prevention and repair effect.

    When a plant is under stress, self-production of amino acids slows because it is an energy-expensive process. Instead the plant hydrolyzes (breaks down) existing proteins to gain the needed amino acids. This process requires less energy than synthesizing from scratch. It also means that the plant may cannibalize itself unless amino acids are provided as supplementation.

    Plants increase L-Proline production during times of abiotic stress to help reduce effect and speed up recovery time. L-Proline primarily influences the cell wall’s strength and resistance to various stresses, like poor weather conditions.

    Photosynthesis

    Photosynthesis is a plant’s most important chemical process. A plant synthesizes sugars from carbon dioxide, water, and light energy. The sugars (carbohydrates) are then used by the plant as a source of energy for other metabolic processes. This critical function is influenced by amino acids.

    L-Glycine and L-Glutamic acid are essential metabolites for chlorophyll synthesis and tissue formation. These amino acids raise the concentration of chlorophyll in plants. More chlorophyll means greater absorption of light energy, which increases photosynthesis.

    Steady source of organic nitrogen

    The most commonly discussed forms of nitrogen used by plants are nitrates (NO3) and ammonium (NH4). Nitrogen is difficult to provide as nutrition because it’s naturally a gas and easily leaches from the soil. Most commercial fertilizers contain these two forms in high quantities. Plants readily use both forms, though different plants do have preference.

    But there is another, less discussed source of nitrogen. Perhaps the lack of discussion is because there is still a lot of research needed on the topic. Organic materials (like L-amino acids) contain organic nitrogen. Once inside the plant, the organic nitrogen is released and used by the plant.

    Since a portion of the nitrogen taken into the plant is used for protein and amino acid synthesis, by providing in ready-to-use form, the plant requires less from nitrates and ammonium for these activities. Why does this matter? As with anything, overdoing any one aspect causes problems somewhere else.

    Excessive nitrates especially tend to create accelerated growth and cell elongation. As the rapidly growing cells form, the cell wall is stretched and thinned. This weaker tissue makes a perfect target for invading pests. You can see this with many field crops like corn—fast growth but weak plants. Excess nitrates also cause antagonism against other important minerals like calcium, magnesium, and potassium
    When nitrates are in balance and nitrogen is also provided by organic sources, cells tend to grow with more natural and sturdy shape. This results in a stronger plant and healthy cells more re- sistant to stress and attack.

    Organic nitrogen provided by L-amino acids also tends to stick around in the soil longer with less leaching. So less fertilizer input is required.

    Stomata are cellular structures that control a plant’s water balance. They are also used during transpiration (breathing from the leaves), as well as the absorption macro and micronutrients. A stoma’s openings are controlled by external factors (light, moisture, temperature and salt concentration) and by internal factors (amino acids, available potassium, etc.).

    Stomata close during periods of low light and moisture and when salt concentration and temperatures are high. When stomata close, photosynthesis and transpiration are reduced and respiration is increased. This lowers the plant’s metabolic balance and slows or stops growth. L-Glutamic acid works as an osmotic agent for the protective cells, which can increase the opening of stomata.

    Mineral chelation

    One of the most significant roles amino acids play is enhancing the bioavailability of nutrients. Certain nutrients are not absorbable by plants due to molecular structure, ionic charge, etc. L-amino acids (and some other organic acids) work to ‘hide’ these unavailable minerals so the plant can absorb and transport the minerals.
    By chelating with amino acids, the overall amount of minerals existing in a nutrient solution and growing medium becomes available for uptake and transport throughout the plant. In addition, amino acids allow for more effective foliar feeding by transporting minerals into the stomata.

    L-Glycine and L-Glutamic acid amino acids are known as very effective chelating agents primarily because of their small molecular weight. Their size allows them to easily move through cell membranes.

    In addition to increasing the availability of good nutrients, amino acids are also shown to reduce metal toxicity in plants and soil by binding with excess metals. This helps to balance the levels of various elements in the medium.

    Precursors to plant hormones and growth factors

    Some amino acids are precursors of various plant hormones and other growth compounds.

    L-Methionine is a precursor of ethylene (important for fruit and flower ripening) and other growth factors such as Espermine and Espermidine.
    L-Tryptophan is a precursor of auxin synthesis (only available if produced through enzymatic hydrolyzation)

    Indole-3-Acetic acid (essential rooting growth hormone) requires L-Tryptophan

    L-Arginine is a precursor to cytokinin production

    Several amino acids influence gene expression (telling the plant what to do)
    Pollination and fruit formation

    Amino acids are used extensively during peak metabolic activities. Pollination and fruit formation are two of the most important times for plants, thus metabolic activity is heightened.

    L-Histidine helps ripen fruit

    L-Proline increases pollen fertility

    L-Lysine, L-Methionine, and L-Glutamic acid increase pollen germination and the length of the pollen tube

    L-Alanine, L-Valine, and L-Leucine improve the quality of fruit
    Microbe activity in growing medium

    Since all life is dependent upon amino acids, this includes all the little microbes living in and around the root area. These microbes utilize amino acids much like plants do.

    Some amino acids are used as building blocks for structural components and protein synthesis. Others are used as stimulants for production of various hormonal and growth compounds. For example, L-methionine is a precursor of growth factors that stabilize cell membranes in microbes. Some microbes also consume amino acids as a source of organic nitrogen and proteins.

    In addition, amino acids in the soil provide a rich source of organic material to help build soil structure, fertility, and water retention.

  6. #6
    Marijuana Growing Member
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    I ran across a thread here at this site where some individuals were brainstorming how to concoct these amino acids, or what they needed to achieve these building blocks. They mentioned letting fish and alfalfa ferment. Here is a list of the amino acids found within a can of brewers yeast.


    ***Typical Amino Acid Profile Per Serving***
    L-Alanine 1080mg L-Lysine 1170mg
    L-Arginine 750mg L-Methionine 270mg
    L-Aspartic Acid 1710mg L-Phenylalanine 750mg
    L-Cysteine 270mg L-Proline 660mg
    L-Glutamic Acid 3330mg L-Serine 930mg
    L-Glycine 780mg L-Threonine 930mg
    L-Histidine 870mg L-Tryptophan 120mg
    L-Isoleucine 750mg L-Tyrosine 330mg
    L-Leucine 1230mg L-Valine 900mg
    ***Approximate Values

    Now this is ALL very new to me. Yet the information i am finding during my research is all pointing to the benefits of adding such an amendment to our soil. There is even a Hightimes article about using it for HYDRO.

  7. #7
    Marijuana Growing Member
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    This High Times article speaks of amino acids role in hydro growing and how they help keep equipment running free of calcium deposits

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/hightim...ino-acids/amp/

  8. #8
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    The research I have come across suggests that we do not pay enough attention to the bio-life inside the soil. There is so much going on within the soil on a micro level that it at times get over looked. I am learning that enhancing, improving, creating, feeding, and caring for those micro-organisms is as much a part of growing quality cannabis as it is watering.

  9. #9
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    @Foggy Dell
    Hahahaha...look who showed up! Yeah you are correct. The soil life is important. Unless someone is feeding pre-chelated "hydro nutes" then soil life IS NOT needed to breakdown the nutes. But if using hydro nutes, one needs to watchout for salt (nitrate) build up. And pH fluctuations due to lack of biology breaking down everything and regulating the pH. But i find it hard to effectively keep soil active within city limits. The cities use chloramines nowadays to kill anything biological within the water. And my assumption would be that the city water compromises a biologically enriched soil and almost negates the ability to brew a compost tea without using fish tank additives to make the water safe for bacteria to grow in. Hydros yields blow away soils yields. Yet everyone knows when they puff on an organically grown harvest. Quality and flavor and smoothness is unparalleled. In my opinion.

  10. #10
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    I was checking that dude giving those seeds away, sounds real sketchy. You would need a neutral address for shipping to. I don't have one. Not shipping to own address. Hahaha, hope people think about that.

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